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David C. Drake, age 69, of Thayer, NE died Monday, August 19, 2019 at UNMC Buffett Cancer Center in Omaha, NE. Drake was a longtime member and sponsor of Kansas Grain and Feed Association, as well as a steadfast supporter and exhibitor of the Kansas Agri Business Expo. He was born April 27, 1950 to Eugene “Gene” and Vivian (Broton) Drake at Devils Lake, North Dakota. He attended and graduated High School at Lakota, ND (Go Raiders!) Dave while on a basketball scholarship attended and graduated from NDSU in Bottineau, ND with...

A federal court yesterday sided with Kansas and declared that the Obama-era Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule exceeded federal authority and violated administrative procedures, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt said. “From the beginning, it was clear to us that the WOTUS rule proposed by President Obama’s administration went far beyond the authority granted to the federal agencies by the Clean Water Act and did not go through the proper administrative procedures prior to its adoption,” Schmidt said. “This ruling agrees with our assessment and lays the groundwork for the...

Remember the following when preparing for harvest: • Anticipate equipment problems before they arise and make sure a plan is in place to address them. • Check maintenance records to ensure that equipment is in proper working order and that critical maintenance activities are performed. Critical items may include belts, lagging, buckets, bearings, dryers, and grain stream processing equipment. • Make sure that hazard monitoring equipment (belt alignment, motion detection, bearing temperature) is connected and operational. • Stock critical parts in preparation for breakdowns. • Allow adequate time for preventive maintenance activities during busy periods. •...

Use the following checklist to prepare for hot weather and to make sure that all appropriate precautions are in place. Develop a list of hot weather supplies (e.g., water, shade devices, etc.). Estimate quantities that will be needed, and decide who will be responsible for obtaining and transportation supplies and checking that supplies are not running low. Create and emergency action plan for heat-related illnesses (who will provide first aid and emergency services, if necessary). Develop acclimatization schedule for new workers or workers returning from absences longer than one week. ...

Exposure to heat can cause illness and death. The threat is real. Common type of heat illnesses include heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Symptoms of heat exhaustion include headache, dizziness, fainting, weakness, irritability, confusion, thirst, nausea, and vomiting. Symptoms of heat stroke include confusion, loss of consciousness, or seizures. Train employees to recognize these symptoms in themselves and others. To prevent heat related illnesses: • Schedule hot jobs during cooler periods of the day. • Hydrate - drink at least one pint of water per hour (recommended). • Take regularly scheduled breaks in a cool...

The hot, hazy days of summer are here. The heat can be especially harmful for those who work outdoors in direct sunlight or in hot environments, making them susceptible to heat-induced illnesses such as heat stress, heat exhaustion, or the more serious heat stroke. "Working in extreme temperatures is not only uncomfortable, it can be life-threatening," said former OSHA Deputy Assistant Secretary Jordan Barab in 2016. "As we move into the summer months, it is important for workers and their employers to minimize the chances of heat-induced illnesses, and imperative that they recognize...

Location To prevent fire extinguishers from being moved or damaged, they should be mounted on brackets or in wall cabinets with their carrying handles 3-1/2 to five feet above the floor. In addition, a sign indicating the location of the fire extinguisher should be present. Inspection Fire extinguishers need to be inspected at least monthly. The inspection assures that they will operate effectively when needed. When inspecting a fire extinguisher, ask the following questions: • Is each fire extinguisher in its designated place, clearly visible, and not blocked by equipment, pallets, or other objects that could...

After December 16, 2019, all motor carriers and drivers subject to the ELD rule will be required to use electronic logging devices (ELDs) to record hours-of-service data. To help the motor carrier industry and ELD providers prepare for this important deadline, FMCSA is hosting a series of live question and answer sessions. Register for a Live ELD Q&A Session To keep these sessions as informative for the participants as possible, FMCSA is segmenting the Q&A sessions by audience. Select the most relevant session for you and register using the links below. Sessions for...

Three common types of fire extinguishers are found in most workplaces, including: • Air-pressurized water extinguishers (APW). • Carbon dioxide fire extinguishers. • Multi-purpose dry chemical extinguishers. Air-Pressurized Air-pressurized water extinguishers (APW) are commonly used on type A fires involving ordinary combustibles. They are recognized easily by their large silver container.  APW extinguishers are filled two-thirds of the way with ordinary water and pressurized with air. They extinguish the fire by cooling the surface of the fuel to remove the "heat" from the fire triangle (heat, oxygen, and fuel). APW fire extinguishers should never be...

The clock is ticking, you have one more day to amp up your advocacy for the ratification of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). Make sure your voice is heard by your members of Congress by using National Grain and Feed Association’s (NGFA) easy advocacy tool. Hundreds of your fellow NGFA members have already done so. It takes just minutes to: • Send a pre-drafted email to your members of Congress, • Tweet your senators and representative, and • Call the office of your representative and senators by using NGFA’s brief script. If you use the NGFA's web-based advocacy tool to record your efforts...

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